PERMITTED Development

Conducting house renovations under permitted development rights is always the preferred option, saving you a lot of time and money by avoiding the requirement for planning permission. Permitted development rights are an automatic grant of planning permission, which usually apply if you are planning a single story extension. Where a relevant permitted development right is in place, you do not need to apply to your local planning authority for permission to extend your property in certain ways. However, in specific areas of the country, also known as ‘designated areas’, permitted development rights can be more restricted if you are living in a conservation area, listed building or otherwise restricted property. Although it’s essential to check with a specialist, permitted development rights should provide you with automatic planning permission for properties such as:

Prior APPROVAL

Prior approval is a formal submission to your local planning authority, seeking confirmation on whether specified parts of a development are acceptable, before work can commence. Although formal planning permission is not always required, certain aspects of your project may need to meet specific limitations and conditions. This temporary scheme was introduced in 2013 by the Government to double the depth that properties can be extended and their uses under Permitted Development. Gaining approval under this scheme is normally quite straightforward, as long as you provide all the necessary information to the council, and your neighbours agree to the planned work.
TERRACED HOUSES

Ground floor extensions which are no more than 3 metres in depth and 4 metres in height.

SEMI-DETACHED HOUSES

Ground floor extensions which are no more than 3 metres in depth and 4 metres in height.

DETACHED HOUSES

Ground floor extensions which are no more than 3 metres in depth and 4 metres in height.

PRIOR APPROVAL

Prior approval is a formal submission to your local planning authority, seeking confirmation on whether specified parts of a development are acceptable, before work can commence. Although formal planning permission is not always required, certain aspects of your project may need to meet specific limitations and conditions. This temporary scheme was introduced in 2013 by the Government to double the depth that properties can be extended and their uses under Permitted Development. Gaining approval under this scheme is normally quite straightforward, as long as you provide all the necessary information to the council, and your neighbours agree to the planned work.

PLANNING PERMISSION

If your extension or building work does not comply with the Permitted Development regulations, you will require Planning Permission to conduct the work. This is the consent of your local authority on a proposed building project and is in place to deter inappropriate development. It will be their responsibility to determine whether approval is granted, taking into account various factors in line with national guidance and the requirements of your local authority. At Park Lane Extensions, we can help you through this process, as our expertise and knowledge means we are best placed to help you secure this permission. We are better-placed to understand the intricacies of local planning policy and present a well-considered application.

PARTY WALL MATTERS

The Party Wall Act applies to most work carried out to party walls, which means you will have to serve notice of the proposed works on your neighbours, covering shared walls between semi-detached and terraced houses. This party wall agreement is also needed for other shared structures, such as the floors between flats or maisonettes, garden boundary walls, as well as excavations close to a neighbour’s property. Serving a party wall notice can be completed for free and a neighbour has fourteen days to respond, and in most cases there is no need to appoint a party wall surveyor or have a Party Wall Award. This is where the condition of your neighbour’s property would be documented before the works are carried out, but you would be responsible for the costs to your and your neighbour’s surveyor.

FREEHOLDER PERMISSION

If you are looking to put a single storey extension on a leasehold property or you own a share of freehold, as an example, you would need to obtain a license to carry out these structural works. In this instance, you would need to check your lease to see if you are allowed to make any alterations and consult your freeholder directly. Although freeholder consent cannot be unreasonably withheld, it can potentially be a lengthy and costly process depending on the terms of the lease, and the freeholder may want to conduct their own checks on the plans. You may also need to appoint a solicitor and pay administration fees, so it is important to factor these fees in when budgeting for your project and before instructing a house extensions company.

Anglian WATER

When planning to extend your home, it is highly likely that you are going to be building over, or near, Anglian Water public pipes. If you are looking to build within three metres of a public sewer, or within one metre of a public lateral drain, you will require a Anglian Water Build Over Agreement before starting any work, so it is essential to speak to a professional to make sure the pipework is protected. By working with our team, we can assist you in this process and advise you on whether the existing drainage has any implications on the build, evaluating whether you need to apply for permission.

Why should you get a house extension?

Park Lane Extensions will take responsibility for the entire project and work with you to achieve your vision. Our work has taken us throughout the whole of Northamptonshire, with our team always focusing on making every single storey extension project as simple and as stress-free as possible.

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